06

  • Beating-heart transplant

    Surgeons at Stanford Medicine believe the new technique, which has now been performed on six patients, will improve health outcomes for recipients and boost the pool of available organs.

  • Antibiotics linked to poorer cancer survival

    Triple-negative breast cancer patients who used antibiotics within three years of diagnosis have an increased risk of death, according to a study. The gut microbiome is a likely link.

  • Bertozzi to speak at graduation

    Winner of the Nobel Prize in chemistry will be the keynote speaker at the Stanford School of Medicine graduation ceremony.

  • New COVID-19 vaccine

    In a study led by Stanford Medicine researchers, a low-cost COVID-19 vaccine that does not require refrigeration provided immunity in rhesus monkeys for one year.

  • First abdominal wall transplant in state

    The 22-year-old patient had waited years for an intestinal transplant. At Stanford Medicine, a combined intestinal and abdominal wall transplant gave him an even better option.

  • Skin-colonizing bacteria help fight tumors

    In a study led by Stanford Medicine, researchers harnessed the skin’s immune response to bacteria to create an immunotherapy — delivered by swab — that treats aggressive tumors in mice.

  • DNA circles drive cancer development

    Tiny circles of DNA harbor cancer-associated oncogenes and immunomodulatory genes promoting cancer development. They arise during transformation from pre-cancer to cancer, say Stanford Medicine-led team.

  • Stanford Medicine communications awards

    Faculty and Office of Communications staff earn nine awards from the Association of American Medical Colleges.

  • Agent Orange researcher dies

    James Whitlock, MD, a professor emeritus of molecular pharmacology (now chemical and systems biology), who discovered the negative effects of dioxin on the human body, died at home.

  • Data science meets cardiac science

    While cardiac sphericity was the focus of Stanford Medicine-led research, the possibility of data science expanding the reach of biomedical science was its true core, researchers say.


2023 ISSUE 2

How the environment and health interact