Neuroscience

  • Brain implants steady artist’s hand

    Thanks to deep brain stimulation, an artist stricken with a common but lesser known neurological disorder called essential tremor can paint again with a steady hand.

  • Study reveals immune driver of brain aging

    Scientists have identified a key factor in mental aging and shown that it might be prevented or reversed by fixing a glitch in the immune system’s front-line soldiers.

  • Brain-to-muscle circuit in a dish

    A Stanford Medicine team used human stem cells to assemble a working nerve circuit connecting brain tissue to muscle tissue. The research could enable scientists to better understand neurological disorders that affect movement.

  • High-risk, high-reward grants for researchers

    Annelise Barron, Peter Kim, Siddhartha Jaiswal and Keren Haroush will receive grants totaling $10 million to fund their investigations. The awards support risky efforts that could potentially have a big impact in the biomedical sciences.

  • Neuronal abnormalities in schizophrenia

    A common genetic deletion boosts the risk for schizophrenia by 30-fold. Generating nerve cells from people with the deletion has showed Stanford researchers why.

  • Brain circuitry of dissociation

    Stanford scientists identified brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their bodies and reality.

  • Michael Lim to head neurosurgery

    Lim, a clinician, surgeon and researcher at Johns Hopkins who has focused largely on immunotherapy for brain tumors, will succeed Gary Steinberg as chair of the department, starting Sept. 1.

  • Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center grant

    The Stanford-based center’s affiliated faculty and staff, aided by more than 400 volunteers, conduct research on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and related disorders.

  • Brain abnormalities in PANS

    MRI brain scans show subtle changes consistent with inflammation in a severe childhood disease in which the immune system is thought to attack the brain, Stanford researchers found.

  • Potential autism biomarker found in babies

    Cerebrospinal fluid levels of a hormone called vasopressin were lower in babies who went on to develop autism than in those who did not, a study found.

  • Exercise rejuvenates stem cells of old mice

    The researchers also identified a molecular pathway involved in turning back the clock on the cells. Drugs that could manipulate the pathway might be an effective substitute for exercise, they suggest.


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