Obituaries

  • Pathologist Kempson dies at 92

    Kempson, a founding member of the surgical pathology department, was an inspiring teacher and mentor to hundreds of trainees.

  • LeRoy Heinrichs dies at 90

    The Stanford Medicine professor emeritus of obstetrics and gynecology was an early adopter of less invasive surgical techniques, a pioneer in treating infertility and an evangelist for virtual medical training.

  • Hodgkin lymphoma pioneer Rosenberg dies

    Rosenberg combined radiation and chemotherapy to treat Hodgkin lymphoma, revolutionizing cancer care. He taught at Stanford Medicine for more than 50 years.

  • Howard Sussman dies at 87

    Howard Sussman played a pivotal role in consolidating and automating Stanford Medicine’s clinical pathology laboratory, implementing an information system used for decades.

  • Microbiologist Hugh McDevitt dies at 91

    The Stanford immunologist’s research on how our immune cells recognize pathogens — and what happens when this process goes wrong — paved the way to modern immunology.

  • Lisa Wise-Faberowski dies at 57

    Lisa Wise-Faberowski, who studied a rare congenital heart condition as well as the effects of anesthesia on children’s developing brains, died at 57.

  • Neurobiologist Denis Baylor dies at 82

    Baylor, former chair of the Department of Neurobiology, gained international recognition for discovering the electrical language used by the retina to translate light from the outside world into signals that the brain reads.

  • Immunologist Samuel Strober dies at 81

    Strober, a professor and former chief of immunology and rheumatology, found a way for transplant recipients to reduce or abandon immunosuppressive drugs yet avoid organ rejection.

  • William Northway dies at 89

    The Stanford pediatric radiologist, after noticing a new and disturbing pattern among lung X-rays of premature infants, forever altered treatment for the smallest babies.

  • Hematologist Steven Coutre dies

    Steven Coutre was known for his research on chronic lymphocytic leukemia, his humility and his love of traveling and family.

  • Healthy-aging proponent James Fries dies at 83

    The professor of rheumatology and immunology created an early computer database to follow rheumatology patients. The knowledge he gained from it precipitated his “compression of morbidity” hypothesis.